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Wrought Aluminium Alloys

Leonardo da Vinci, Helsinki Award 2006, Design and execution: Gerold Fink, Austria. Click to open PDF document about this award

Leonardo Da Vinci Helsinki Award 2006

Leonardo da Vinci, Helsinki Award 2006, Design and execution: Gerold Fink, Austria. Click to open PDF document about this award

Bronze medal for an outstanding project promoting and supporting the LifeLong Learning EU policy. Award Berlin 2007

 
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8xxx Series Alloys

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Key

  Major elements
  Minor elements

This series comprises alloys in which the major alloying element is other than for the other series, as well as a number of commercial purity alloys based on Al–Fe–Si which are too concentrated to be classed as 1xxx series.

For example:

  • Al-Li alloys used for aerospace applications
  • Alloys with more than 1 % Fe used for foil

Included in the 8xxx series are the relatively recently developed Al–Li alloys 8090, 8091 and 8093. Lithium has a significantly lower density than aluminium and since its solubility is also relatively high, it can be alloyed with aluminium in sufficient quantities to give a significant reduction in density (typically about 10% less than other aluminium alloys). Not only do the resulting alloys also have increased stiffness, they also respond to age-hardening. Further, the resistance against fatigue crack growth is increased at intermediate stress levels. This attractive combination of properties has led to much interest, particularly for aerospace applications. These alloys have a high volume fraction of coherent, ordered LiAl3 precipitates that are responsible for these properties. SiStrength: alloys such as 8011 are based on Al–Fe–Si, but with more than 1 wt% total alloying element present to give correspondingly higher strengths. Such alloys find application as foil and closures as well as heat exchanger finstock.

A group of alloys containing about 5 % Calcium and 5 % zinc have superplastic properties.

Alloys of iron and manganese near the ternary eutectic content, such as 8006, can have useful combinations of strength and ductility at room temperature and retain strength at elevated temperatures. The properties are due to the fine grain size stabilized by the finely dispersed iron-rich second phase.

Alloys such as 8011 are based on Al–Fe–Si, but with more than 1 wt% total alloying element present to give correspondingly higher strengths. Such alloys find application as foil and closures as well as heat exchanger finstock.

Alloys of iron and manganese near the ternary eutectic content, such as 8006, can have useful combinations of strength and ductility at room temperature and retain strength at elevated temperatures. The properties are due to the fine grain size stabilized by the finely dispersed iron-rich second phase.

Al–Ni–Fe alloy 8001 is used in nuclear power generation for applications demanding resistance to aqueous corrosion at elevated temperatures and pressures. Al–Ni–Fe alloy 8001 is used in nuclear power generation for applications demanding resistance to aqueous corrosion at elevated temperatures and pressures.

Alloys included in the 8xxx series are bearing alloys commonly used in cars and trucks which are based on the Al–Sn system (e.g., 8280 and 8081).

Authors/Contributors